•   
  •   
  •   

World Pentagon: Taliban working to ‘isolate’ Kabul, but capital isn’t in ‘imminent’ danger

15:00  25 september  2021
15:00  25 september  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Taliban promise to uphold rights for women and US allies, but White House is skeptical

  Taliban promise to uphold rights for women and US allies, but White House is skeptical The Taliban said they won't hurt women. U.S. military commanders work with the militant group to allow Americans and some Afghans to evacuate.Before the U.S.-led invasion in 2001, women virtually had no rights under the fundamentalist Taliban's oppressive rule. Most were forced to quit their jobs and stay at home, denied access to education and health care, enduring high rates of illiteracy and maternal mortality.

The Pentagon insisted that Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, is not in "imminent" danger of falling to the Taliban.

  Pentagon: Taliban working to ‘isolate’ Kabul, but capital isn’t in ‘imminent’ danger © Provided by Washington Examiner

"Kabul is not right now in an imminent threat environment, but clearly, David, if you just look at what the Taliban has been doing, you can see that they are trying to isolate. What they want to do if they achieve that isolation, I think only they can speak to," Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told a reporter during Friday's briefing.

US TROOPS 'WILL TEMPORARILY DEPLOY' TO AFGHANISTAN TO HELP EVACUATE DIPLOMATS

The Taliban have strung together a weeklong military offensive in which they've gained territory in various parts of the country rapidly, leaving the Pentagon "certainly concerned," Kirby said.

'Nobody should be surprised': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban

  'Nobody should be surprised': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban Analysts say there were signs the Afghan military – unmotivated, disorganized and plagued by low morale – would struggle against the Taliban. "They were evident for a long time," said retired Lt. Col. Daniel Davis, a twice-deployed veteran of the war in Afghanistan. "Nobody should be surprised by these outcomes if they had been paying attention." More: A timeline of the US withdrawal and Taliban recapture of Afghanistan Unmotivated to fight for 'corrupt' government The U.S. pumped more than $80 billion in equipment and training into the Afghan security forces since the start of the war in Afghanistan, which the U.S.

Hours before the briefing, the militant group captured Kandahar and Herat, the former of which has significance given its location, marking the Taliban's 14th provincial capital under their control, with 34 countrywide.

"We have noted with great concern the speed with which they have been moving and the lack of resistance they have faced," Kirby added.

The deteriorating situation in Afghanistan prompted the Biden administration to announce Thursday the deployment of thousands of troops to assist the withdrawal of U.S. diplomats from Afghanistan, though they maintain the embassy will remain open.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The "bulk" of the 3,000 troops heading to Afghanistan will be there by the end of the week.

‘No possible life’ under Taliban rule: Afghan women fear murder, oppression after US withdrawal

  ‘No possible life’ under Taliban rule: Afghan women fear murder, oppression after US withdrawal "If the Taliban returns to power, I along with other women who work in the government will either be stoned to death or executed in public."These memories are invariably the stuff of nightmares.

The plan is for these troops to be out of Afghanistan by the end of the month, which coincides with the date Joe Biden set for a complete withdrawal, Kirby said a day earlier.

Washington Examiner Videos

Tags: News, Afghanistan, War in Afghanistan, Taliban, Pentagon, National Security, John Kirby

Original Author: Mike Brest

Original Location: Pentagon: Taliban working to ‘isolate’ Kabul, but capital isn’t in ‘imminent’ danger

The bursting 'Ka-bubble': Taliban extremism is remaking a once-cosmopolitan Kabul .
Restless Kabul residents ponder what remains and what changes in the Afghan capital after more than a month of Taliban rule.Some would say it was less a place than a feeling, the sense that this metropolis — supercharged by billions in Western assistance — was somehow insulated from the daily battles grinding outside the city gates. That wasn't entirely true. Bombings, assassinations and attacks echoed through the capital over the years. But unlike the provinces and hinterlands, this messy city of markets, mosques and green Ford Ranger pickup trucks felt like a relatively safe space in a battered nation.

usr: 1
This is interesting!