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World Biden Official Expresses Concerns for Women in Afghanistan in Deleted Tweet

15:10  25 september  2021
15:10  25 september  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

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In a now-deleted tweet an official serving in President Joe Biden's State Department raised her personal concerns about the women of Afghanistan as the Taliban continues to make rapid gains and takeover large swaths of the country in the wake of the withdrawal of U.S. forces there.

a little boy that is standing in the street: Halida ,11, whose father was killed by the Taliban, holds her cousin Shafika, 8 months, next to family as displaced Afghans arrive at a makeshift camp from the northern provinces desperately leaving their homes behind on August 10 in Kabul, Afghanistan. © Paula Bronstein /Getty Images Halida ,11, whose father was killed by the Taliban, holds her cousin Shafika, 8 months, next to family as displaced Afghans arrive at a makeshift camp from the northern provinces desperately leaving their homes behind on August 10 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Molly Montgomery, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, on Friday morning tweeted her concerns for the women of Afghanistan but later deleted the post. According to the State Department website, Montgomery formerly worked at the U.S. embassy in Kabul, as well as multiple other Foreign service postings.

Joe Biden's Speech on Afghanistan—7 Key Takeaways

  Joe Biden's Speech on Afghanistan—7 Key Takeaways The president said he stood by his decision to remove U.S. troops and that "nation building" was never the goal in Afghanistan.The Taliban seized control of Afghanistan two weeks before the U.S. was scheduled to fully withdraw its troops, who have been there since 2001.

"Woke up with a heavy heart, thinking about all the Afghan women and girls I worked with during my time in Kabul. They were the beneficiaries of many of the gains we made, and now they stand to lose everything. We empowered them to lead, now we are powerless to protect them," Montgomery wrote in the since-deleted Twitter post.

A source at the State Department told Newsweek Montgomery deleted the tweet of her own volition and was not asked to remove the post.

The concerns from the high-ranking State Department official have been echoed by many in Washington and across the country. The Taliban has moved rapidly to retake large portions of Afghanistan as the U.S. and its allies have withdrawn their remaining troops in the country.

GOP Unites to Criticize Biden Over Afghanistan Takeover, Troop Withdrawal

  GOP Unites to Criticize Biden Over Afghanistan Takeover, Troop Withdrawal "I think Donald Trump bears huge blame and Joe Biden will ultimately bear the ultimate blame," Republican Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois said.The GOP was split when the plan was originally announced by President Donald Trump, with some supporting the decision and others opposed. Those against the withdrawal argued Monday that Biden should have seen the Taliban takeover coming while those initially in support criticized him for doing a poor job.

The Biden administration has appeared surprised by how rapidly Taliban forces have overrun the U.S.-backed Afghan security forces. The Washington Post reported that military and intelligence officials have said the capital Kabul, and the U.S.-backed government there, could fall within a month to 90 days.

The administration of former President Donald Trump first signed a peace deal with the Taliban in February 2020, which would have withdrawn all U.S. troops from the country by May 1. Biden later extended that withdrawal deadline date to September 11, but then brought it forward to August 31. The Afghanistan War has become the longest in U.S. history, running from October 2001 to the present.

"The status quo was not an option. Staying meant U.S. troops taking casualties. American men and women," Biden said in early July, defending the withdrawal. The president said the mission the U.S. set out to achieve in the country was already accomplished years ago.

Biden’s defense falls flat with Afghans still wondering if they will make it out before US leaves

  Biden’s defense falls flat with Afghans still wondering if they will make it out before US leaves ON THE DEFENSIVE: Under fire from all sides for the chaotic U.S. evacuation effort following the Taliban's takeover of Kabul, President Joe Biden helicoptered back from his Camp David vacation to defend his decision to end the American military mission in Afghanistan, while offering scant explanation for why the rapidity of the collapse of Afghan forces caught him off guard. © Provided by Washington Examiner DOD header 2020 “We planned for every contingency, but I always promised the American people that I would be straight with you.

"The mission was accomplished in that we got Osama bin Laden and terrorism is not emanating from that part of the world," Biden said. Bin Laden—the alleged mastermind behind the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S.—was killed under the administration of former President Barack Obama in May 2011. The Al Qaeda leader was residing in Pakistan when he was killed by U.S. forces.

The Taliban have already seized Afghanistan's second and third largest cities. Reuters reported on Friday the hardline Islamist militant group retook control of Kandahar, Herat and Lashkar Gah. Meanwhile, the U.S. military has redeployed troops to Kabul to assist in the evacuation of U.S. diplomats and other officials there. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans have fled their homes since the start of the year, according to the United Nations.

Related Articles

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  • Afghanistan Videos Show Taliban Victories, Government Retreat As Collapse Looms
  • Canada, U.K. Join U.S. in Deploying Troops to Afghanistan to Evacuate Citizens

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Defense secretaries in their own words: US 'invented reasons' to stay in Afghanistan .
The Taliban blitz exposes the failure of the 20-year Afghanistan war and portends terrorism threats, say former defense secretaries Panetta and Hagel.Afghan security forces, trained and equipped at the cost of $83 billion, wilted before Taliban fighters. With few exceptions, the Taliban rolled through provincial capitals without a fight despite a force of Afghan troops that was supposed to number more than 300,000.  In reality, there were far fewer Afghan forces because of desertions and commanders who reportedly pocketed the pay of ghost soldiers they had kept on rolls. For those who remained and fought, there wasn't enough ammunition and food, to say nothing of pay.

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