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World The daughter of the Russian journalist who won the Nobel Peace Prize told us why the big win is really an honor for their dad's 'dead colleagues'

10:30  14 october  2021
10:30  14 october  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

Journalists from Philippines, Russia given Nobel Peace Prize

  Journalists from Philippines, Russia given Nobel Peace Prize OSLO (AP) — The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. They were citing for their fight for freedom of expression. The winners were announced Friday by Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. OSLO (AP) — The winner of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize is being announced Friday, an award intended to honor an individual or organization that has “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations.”The Norwegian Nobel Committee will announce the recipient in Oslo at about 11 a.m. (0900 GMT; 5 a.m. EDT).

The daughter of the Russian journalist who won the Nobel Peace Prize told us why the big win is really an honor for their dad ' s ' dead colleagues '. Their dad may be one of the biggest names in the world of reporting after co- winning the Peace Prize with Filipina journalist Maria Ressa, but he also leads a newsroom in a country where watchdog groups say 23 journalists have been killed in the last 10 years. This harsh reality has been part of Muratova's life since they were a child, when their dad would share tales from the life of a slain reporter instead of bedtime stories.

who won the Nobel Peace Prize told us why the big win is really an honor for their dad ' s ' dead of Dmitry Muratov, one of the winners of this year's Nobel Peace Prize , is studying to be a journalist at Finley Muratova, 21, sees the honor as a win for the…

Finley Muratova, pictured here at age 10 taking a selfie with their father's camera. Photo courtesy of Finley Muratova © Provided by Business Insider Finley Muratova, pictured here at age 10 taking a selfie with their father's camera. Photo courtesy of Finley Muratova
  • The daughter of Dmitry Muratov, one of the winners of this year's Nobel Peace Prize, is studying to be a journalist at New York University.
  • Finley Muratova, 21, sees the honor as a win for the Russian newspaper their father leads, as well as for the journalists killed protecting the freedom of the press.
  • Among those was investigative reporter Anna Politkovskaya, who was murdered in 2006. Muratova knew her as a child, and they said she's inspired their career.

Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov phoned his daughter Finley Muratova last Friday after he'd won the Nobel Peace Prize - but because Muratova is a college student in New York, the call reached them at 6 a.m while they were still in bed.

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The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments (military weapons and equipment) manufacturer Alfred Nobel

Journalists Maria Ressa, from the Philippines, and Dmitry Muratov, from Russia, have won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for their "efforts to safeguard freedom of expression". Why are the organisation' s prizes so prestigious, and who are some of the previous winners? Different organisations award the prize in each category every year. Five of the six are chosen in Sweden, while the Nobel Peace Prize is selected in Norway. Academics, university professors, scientists, previous winners and others all submit nominations. Under the Nobel Foundation' s rules, the shortlists are not allowed to be

"I got scared that something bad must have happened," Muratova, 21, told Insider. "And then he told me the news, and I was quite dumbfounded in a good way."

Muratova is used to feeling dread when family calls from Russia. Their dad may be one of the biggest names in the world of reporting after co-winning the Peace Prize with Filipina journalist Maria Ressa, but he also leads a newsroom in a country where watchdog groups say 23 journalists have been killed in the last 10 years.

This harsh reality has been part of Muratova's life since they were a child, when their dad would share tales from the life of a slain reporter instead of bedtime stories. And now as a journalist in training completing their last year of school at New York University, Muratova said that the sacrifices made by champions of free speech are what drove them to follow in their father's footsteps.

Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win 2021 Nobel Peace Prize

  Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win 2021 Nobel Peace Prize Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov “ won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. Your browser does not support this video The Norwegian Nobel Committee, which is responsible for selecting the Nobel Peace Prize recipients each year, decided to award this year's prize to both Ressa, of the Philippines, and Muratov, of Russia, "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace." © Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo, File Along with the notoriety and a gold medal, they will receive a cash award of 10 million Swedish krona, or about $1.

The former US secretary of state won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973 for the Paris Peace Accords to end the Vietnam war. However, Kissinger had also just spearheaded a series of secret aerial bombings in southeast Asia and either killed, wounded, or made homeless an estimated 6 million people. One of most controversial moves in Nobel Peace Prize history came in 1948 – the year the committee could not find one person in the world worthy of their stature. However, 1948 is also the year Mahatma Gandhi, who led India’ s non-violent movement for independence, was assassinated.

“Since Nobel Peace Prizes are not awarded posthumously, I think that [the committee] came up with a way to give it to Anna Politkovskaya through me.” The writer and academic was shot to death in 2006 in the elevator of her apartment building. Russian investigators insist there was no evidence of state involvement in the incident and have said it could prove to be a contract slaying. Both Muratov and Ressa will be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on the December 10, on the anniversary of the death of the founder of the awards, Alfred Nobel . Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

"I just always knew that I wanted to be a journalist, because of my dad and because of the people that I grew up around," they said in a Zoom interview with Insider.

Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of the Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, talks to the media. Sergei Bobylev/TASS via Reuters © Sergei Bobylev/TASS via Reuters Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of the Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, talks to the media. Sergei Bobylev/TASS via Reuters

As a child, Muratova would run down the hallways of Novaya Gazeta, the Russian newspaper that Muratov co-founded in 1993 (he currently serves as its editor-in-chief). The Nobel Committee described the outlet as "the most independent newspaper in Russia today, with a fundamentally critical attitude towards power."

One of its most influential staffers was Anna Politkovskaya, an internationally renowned investigative reporter who spoke out against human-rights abuses. She was shot and killed in her Moscow apartment building in 2006.

"When Anna was murdered, life changed a lot," said Muratova, who was 6 years old at the time. "I don't think it was ever particularly safe for my father or his colleagues. But it felt like life changed a lot - for me at least."

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Live Updates: Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to 2 Journalists , Highlighting Fight for Press Freedom. In an era of increasing authoritarianism and swirling misinformation, Maria Ressa and Dmitri A. Muratov, who lead independent news outlets in the Philippines and Russia, were honored for their work to hold leaders to account. Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitri Muratov are awarded the Nobel Peace Prize . The newspaper Dmitri Muratov founded has seen six reporters killed for their work. Philippine journalist Maria Ressa has incurred President Rodrigo Duterte’ s wrath.

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday made a seeming threat toward journalist Dmitry Muratov, who was recently awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work at the Novaya Gazeta newspaper. "If he covers himself with the Nobel Prize like a shield to violate Russian laws, he does so Muratov has already said he would be dedicating the award to the six journalists at his newspaper who have been killed over the years. The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the Nobel Peace Prize jointly to Muratov and Filipino journalist Maria Ressa on Friday. Both were honored as champions of freedom


Video: Nobel winner hears of award from 94-year-old dad (Associated Press)

Though Muratova doesn't remember their childhood interactions with Politkovskaya, they said the slain reporter has been a major influence in their career as a burgeoning reporter.

Muratova has written about Politkovskaya for The Nation, and they've translated the subtitles in a documentary released by Novaya Gazeta on Oct. 6, a day before the statute of limitations on the murder's investigation was set to expire. (The Nobel Committee announced the Peace Prize on Oct. 8.)

"I think that for a solid while, I felt like I was losing hope in journalism or human-rights defenses, or in goodness, for that matter," Muratova said. "And the way she never gave up was something that always made me feel like there has to be a reason to not give up. And I think that that's why writing about her was the path I took."

In their own work as a journalist in the U.S., Muratova reports on Title IX cases and investigates the ways that the Department of Education has failed survivors of sexual violence.

The Nobel Peace Prize recognizes the growing dangers faced by journalists

  The Nobel Peace Prize recognizes the growing dangers faced by journalists The awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to two journalists for their fearless reporting resonated in newsrooms worldwide. The award “recognizes the contribution of journalism to bring about a better society through the search for truths that are uncomfortable for the powerful,” tweeted Jaime Abello Banfi, director of the Gabo Foundation, which is dedicated to improving journalism in Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking nations.The prize rewards “independent journalists the world over," he said.

Title IX is a federal civil rights law that prohibits sexual discrimination, including sexual harassment and campus violence, at educational institutions that receive federal funding.

Muratova said they found their current calling when NYU rehired a professor it had previously suspended after finding she had sexually harassed a student. Muratova, who describes themselves as someone who rarely gets angry, was furious.

As a writer for Washington Square News, the independent student-run newspaper at NYU, Muratova wrote an opinion piece that revealed that they had been sexually assaulted as a teenager.

Going public with their experience was not Muratova's original intent for the piece, but the admission allowed others to reach out to them directly.

"I started receiving a cascade of emails from people who went for Title IX at NYU [and felt] let down by the school, either by incompetence or by the school's self-preservation instinct," Muratova said. "My father taught me the sheer importance of being humane and available to people who might need me."

The show of support pushed them to dig deeper into the issue, and it's just one of many topics they hope to continue covering after graduating this coming spring.

"I hope I can do justice to the people who choose to trust me with their stories," Muratova said. "I hope I have a strong enough moral compass that I can keep holding on to that hope no matter where I go."

For now, Muratova is taking time to reflect on their dad's historic win, which they're quick to emphasize is really a win for the newsroom he runs. (Muratov has pledged to donate the Nobel's cash winnings to charities and special causes, including a prize named after Politkovskaya.)

Both Muratova and their dad have said the Nobel is a symbolic honor for murdered reporters like Politkovskaya.

"It's an award handed to his dead colleagues. And I know that he said that, but I also solemnly believe that I don't think it's just his by any means," Muratova said. "I hope that it shows the international community that there's a need to pay attention to what's happening to the free media in Russia. So for now, I would say fingers crossed that it brings attention to the issue. And then we'll see where we move from there."

Read the original article on Business Insider

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