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World Man to Be Hanged in Singapore for Trafficking Cannabis

10:30  14 october  2021
10:30  14 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Malaysia and Singpaore ease international travel restrictions as part of 'living with Covid' strategy

  Malaysia and Singpaore ease international travel restrictions as part of 'living with Covid' strategy Singapore and Malaysia have each revealed plans to start reopening their borders as the Southeast Asian neighbors move away from their zero-Covid strategies toward living with the virus. Malaysian Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob said Sunday the country would end its domestic and international travel restrictions for fully vaccinated residents from Monday, after reaching its target of full inoculation for 90% of the adult population.

© Provided by WION. On Tuesday, Singapore 's highest court denied an appeal against a man 's conviction and death sentence for allegedly smuggling cannabis weighing at least 2.2 pounds into the city-state from neighbouring Malaysia. Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, was detained in 2018 during a routine border checkpoint encounter when officials discovered three bundles of the narcotic in his car. He was tried and condemned to death by hanging in February. A court heard that his father, who was also in the car, was unaware of the narcotics and was not charged with any crime.

A man who imported one kilogram of cannabis (about 2.2 pounds) from Malaysia into Singapore in 2018 is set to hang after his appeal against conviction and sentence was dismissed by the Apex Court on Tuesday, October 12. During a routine border checkpoint at Woodlands Checkpoint late in the night on July 12, 2018, police discovered the bundles Bamadhaj was carrying. His father drove the vehicle, but was found to be unaware of the cannabis bundles. The Alleged Crime. Bamadhaj agreed to smuggle the cannabis —a Class A drug in Singapore —two days earlier on July 10, 2018 and

In Singapore, a country with a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs, a man was sentenced to be hanged for trafficking one kilogram of cannabis from Malaysia.

A man in Singapore was sentenced to death after being charged with trafficking cannabis. The flower bud of cannabis sativa in the greenhouse is pictured here. © Getty Images/Oulaphone Sonesouphap A man in Singapore was sentenced to death after being charged with trafficking cannabis. The flower bud of cannabis sativa in the greenhouse is pictured here.

According to Vice, Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, was arrested in 2018 during a routine stop by police at a border checkpoint when officers said three bundles of cannabis were found in his car.

He was then convicted and in February sentenced to hanging. This week, the highest court dismissed his appeal against the conviction.

Singapore expands quarantine-free travel for vaccinated passengers

  Singapore expands quarantine-free travel for vaccinated passengers Singapore on Tuesday began quarantine-free entry for fully vaccinated passengers from eight countries, part of a plan to ease restrictions as the business hub gears up to live with the coronavirus. Passengers arriving as part of this scheme -- which will include South Korea from November 15 -- will not have to quarantine if they have been fully vaccinated and test negative for the virus before they depart and when they arrive. To enable families to travel, Singapore has allowed entry to unvaccinated children aged 12 years and under if they are accompanied by someone flying under the scheme.

In Singapore , a country with a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs, a man was sentenced to be hanged for trafficking one kilogram of cannabis from Malaysia. According to Vice, Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, was arrested in 2018 during a routine stop by police at a border checkpoint when officers said He was then convicted and in February sentenced to hanging . This week, the highest court dismissed his appeal against the conviction. Singapore has hanged hundreds of people, including foreign nationals, in recent decades over drug offenses, Vice reported. In May, Newsweek reported, a

In Singapore , a country with a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs, a man was sentenced to be hanged for trafficking one kilogram of cannabis from Malaysia. According to Vice, Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, was arrested in 2018 during a routine stop by police at a border checkpoint when officers said three bundles of cannabis were found in his car.

Singapore has hanged hundreds of people, including foreign nationals, in recent decades over drug offenses, Vice reported.

In May, Newsweek reported, a man was sentenced to death via Zoom due to COVID-19 protocols in Singapore. He was charged with trafficking heroin.

Prosecutors said that Bamhadhaj pre-ordered and collected the parcels of cannabis near a mosque in Malaysia, but his lawyers pushed back on that accusation. They said there was reasonable doubt about whether the drugs were deliberately imported, Vice reported.

Bamadhaj claimed that his acquaintances in Malaysia had planted the drugs into his bag without his knowledge.

"Singapore's heavy reliance on draconian laws and policies have not only failed to tackle the use and availability of drugs, they also give zero effective protection from drug-related harm and instead facilitate a raft of human rights violations," said Amnesty International's death penalty advisor, Chiara Sangiorgio, as reported by Vice.

Singapore expands quarantine-free travel for vaccinated passengers

  Singapore expands quarantine-free travel for vaccinated passengers Singapore on Tuesday began quarantine-free entry for fully vaccinated passengers from eight countries, part of a plan to ease restrictions as the business hub gears up to live with the coronavirus. Passengers arriving as part of this scheme -- which will include South Korea from November 15 -- will not have to quarantine if they have been fully vaccinated and test negative for the virus before they depart and when they arrive. To enable families to travel, Singapore has allowed entry to unvaccinated children aged 12 years and under if they are accompanied by someone flying under the scheme.

A Singaporean man , who allegedly imported one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of marijuana from Malaysia to Singapore three years ago, is set to be hanged after the Apex Court dismissed his appeal on Tuesday. Death penalty: Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, was arrested at a routine check at Woodlands Checkpoint on July 12, 2018 for possessing three bundles of cannabis . While human rights groups have long criticized the city-state’s government for the death penalty, some citizens believe the punishment could still deter drug trafficking and help keep the crime rate low.

(Newser) – A man in Singapore is going to be hanged for bringing three bundles of cannabis into the country. Omar Yacob Bamadhaj, 41, lost an appeal Tuesday of a sentence handed down in February. In July 2018, Bamadhaj had hopped across the border from the tiny city-state into Malaysia to run errands Amnesty International condemned the decision to dismiss Bamadhaj’s appeal. “ Singapore authorities have violated international safeguards and sentenced yet another person convicted of drug trafficking to death by hanging ,” Chiara Sangiorgio, a death penalty advisor for the NGO said per Vice.

Bamhadhaj said he was coerced into confessing to the crime after authorities told him that if he refused to admit to it both he and his father would be hanged. His father was in the car with him when the drugs were discovered but was not charged.

In 2015, The Economist reported that 32 countries use the death penalty as a punishment for drug smuggling charges. In 2020, at least 30 executions for drug-related offenses are known to have been carried out in China, Iran and Saudi Arabia, according to Amnesty International.

As reported by the Pew Research Center, 17 people in the U.S. were put to death in 2020—the fewest since 1991. Many states have abolished the use of the death penalty as the debate continues over its implementation at all. In July, Attorney General Merrick Garland imposed a moratorium on scheduling federal executions after the federal government put 13 people to death under President Donald Trump in his last year of presidency, NPR reported.

In the U.S., the death sentence can be used for those convicted of a capital crime, which is usually a murder charge.

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Singapore to allow travel for UK and other nations .
The island says it is easing Covid restrictions, and will allow vaccinated travellers from 11 countries.Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said it was time to press on with the "strategy of living with Covid-19".

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