•   
  •   
  •   

World Sudan's PM Hamdok presents road map out of crisis

10:41  16 october  2021
10:41  16 october  2021 Source:   reuters.com

Pro-army Sudanese protesters rally outside PM's office

  Pro-army Sudanese protesters rally outside PM's office Dozens of pro-army demonstrators in Sudan marched for a third consecutive day in the capital Khartoum Monday, demanding Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok step down, AFP journalists said. Hamdok, who gathered his cabinet for an "urgent" meeting, has called recent unrest the "worst and most dangerous crisis" of the country's precarious two-year transition since the fall of hardline ruler Omar al-Bashir. "Down with Hamdok!" the pro-military protestersHamdok, who gathered his cabinet for an "urgent" meeting, has called recent unrest the "worst and most dangerous crisis" of the country's precarious two-year transition since the fall of hardline ruler Omar al-Bashir.

(Reuters) - Sudan's Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok on Friday unveiled a road map to end what he described as the country's "worst and most dangerous" political crisis in its two-year transition.

FILE PHOTO: Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok in Berlin © Reuters/Hannibal Hanschke FILE PHOTO: Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok in Berlin

Since a coup attempt in late September, Sudan's military and civilian power-sharing partners have been locked in a war of words, with military leaders demanding the reform of the cabinet and ruling coalition. Civilian politicians accused the military of aiming for a power grab.

"The coup attempt opened the door for discord, and for all the hidden disputes and accusations from all sides, and in this way we are throwing the future of our country and people and revolution to the wind," Hamdok said in a speech.

Sudan's key Red Sea ports coveted by regional powers

  Sudan's key Red Sea ports coveted by regional powers From Washington to Moscow, Tehran to Ankara, Sudan's strategic Red Sea ports, blockaded for a month by protesters, have long been eyed by global powers far beyond Africa's borders. But for foreign powers who covet Sudan's Red Sea coast, the region has strategic military dimensions. It hosted Iranian fleets for decades under Bashir, to the dismay of Tehran's regional rival Saudi Arabia, whose Red Sea port of Jeddah lies opposite Port Sudan on the other side of the waterway.

Sudan's military and a coalition of civilian political parties have ruled under a power-sharing agreement since the removal of former President Omar al-Bashir in 2019. Bashir loyalists are accused of executing the failed coup attempt.

Hamdok described the current conflict as not between the military and civilians but between those who believe in a transition towards democracy and civilian leadership and those who do not.

"I am not neutral or a mediator in this conflict. My clear and firm position is complete alignment to the civilian democratic transition," he said.

Nevertheless he said he had spoken to both sides, and presented them with a road map that called for the end of escalation and one-sided decision-making and a return to a functioning government.

Rival Sudan camps take to streets as tensions rise

  Rival Sudan camps take to streets as tensions rise Tens of thousands of supporters of Sudan's transition to a civilian-led democracy took to the streets Thursday, as rival demonstrators kept up a sit-in demanding a return to military rule. Both sides appealed to their supporters to keep apart and refrain from any violence, but there was a heavy police and troop presence around potential flashpoints. The two sides represent opposing factions of the Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC), the civilian umbrella group which spearheaded the nationwide demonstrations that led to the army's overthrow of longtime president Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

He emphasized the importance of the formation of a transitional legislature, reform of the military, and the expansion of the base for political participation.

Referring to an ongoing blockade of the country's main port in the East of the country by protesting tribesmen, Hamdok described their grievances as legitimate while asking that they re-open the flow of trade. He also said an international donors' conference to benefit the region was being organized.

Civilian politicians have accused the military of being behind the blockade, which it denies.

Political groups aligned with the military have called for protests in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on Saturday. Groups advocating for civilian rule have called for protests on October 21.

(Reporting By Khalid Abdelaziz and Ahmed Tolba, Writing by Nafisa Eltahir and Moaz Abd-Alaziz, Editing by Chris Reese and Giles Elgood)

Sudan prime minister arrested and taken to 'unknown location' amid coup attempt .
The Sudanese prime minister was arrested and taken to an "unknown location" Monday morning by military forces after refusing to support a coup attempt. © Provided by Washington Examiner Lt. Gen. Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan confirmed in a press conference that the military had taken over the country, following the disappearance of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, according to the New York Times. Burhan also announced that he would be ending the 11 member Transitional Sovereignty Council, the governing body consisting of both civilian and military members.

usr: 6
This is interesting!