•   
  •   
  •   

World In Kenya, your next coffee could be a 'camel-ccino'

11:41  18 october  2021
11:41  18 october  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Swiss-backed project aims to avert new 'Cold War' in science

  Swiss-backed project aims to avert new 'Cold War' in science GENEVA (AP) — Switzerland’s foreign minister says concerns about a “new Cold War” over science and technology are a major reason behind the creation of a new think tank that looks out for future advances and development — so that the whole world can benefit, not just rich countries. Ignazio Cassis delivered a video message for the inaugural “summit” on Thursday and Friday of the Geneva Science and Diplomacy Anticipator, or GESDA, a Swiss government-backed project that aims to bridge government policy and science in an international city known for both.

While tea may be Kenya's largest export, a new beverage is brewing in central Nairobi: cappuccinos made with a splash of camel's milk.

Camels are able to continue producing milk even when precious resources like rain are hard to come by. © Nick Migwi/CNN Camels are able to continue producing milk even when precious resources like rain are hard to come by.

At CJ's Restaurant, a popular café in downtown Nairobi, manager Omar Shariff has noticed a shift. Where demand for camel milk in the past had largely been driven by the local Somali community who grew up with it, today more and more customers are requesting it.

Now, his menu features drinks such as "camel-ccinos" and "camelattes," with plans to introduce camel products beyond beverages, such as a camel burger.

Boston Marathon 2021 start time, route, qualifying times, list of past winners

  Boston Marathon 2021 start time, route, qualifying times, list of past winners Here is everything to know about the Boston Marathon in 2021, including the start time, route and qualifying times for the race, which was rescheduled from the spring to the fall.Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, April's date for the race was postponed to October. The race was canceled last year because of the pandemic, but they held a virtual race instead. This year, there are only around 20,000 participants while there are typically over 30,000.

Though camel milk is consumed across the world in other regions -- including much of the Middle East, parts of Asia and Australia -- its popularity in East Africa has largely stayed within rural groups. But wider interest both regionally and globally has begun to grow, with prices leading some to dub the milk "white gold."

"Camel milk on the international market is incredibly lucrative," notes David Hewett, a ranch manager for the Mpala Research Center located on the Laikipia Plateau in north central Kenya. "Half a liter of finished milk goes for $10 to $20," he says, compared to conventional cow's milk which sells for approximately 50 cents per half liter in the US.

Tapping into an abundant source

The African continent is home to 80% of the world's camels, with approximately 60% residing in East Africa alone. In Kenya, more than four million camels roam the country's pastoral lands, a number that has quadrupled since 1999, according to the Kenya Camel Association.

International Court Ends Dispute With Kenya Over Ocean Boundary By Citing Somalia Civil War

  International Court Ends Dispute With Kenya Over Ocean Boundary By Citing Somalia Civil War The International Court of Justice sided with Somalia in a dispute over territory potentially rich in oil and gas in the Indian Ocean.The ICJ sided with Somalia on Tuesday in the dispute over territory potentially rich in oil and gas.

Though a longtime daily staple for some in the region, the beverage lacks an organized and widespread route to market. Instead, the milk is most often found in informal markets around the country.

Even without a formalized supply chain, the sector contributes 10-12 billion Kenyan shillings ($90-108 million) annually to the country's economy, says Khalif Abey of the Kenya Camel Association.

For one of East Africa's largest camel milk producers, White Gold Camel Milk, the opportunities for growth are apparent. The company produces 500 liters of milk a day, with company CEO Jama Warsame noting local demand has led the company to diversify into other value-added products like flavored camel's milk and yogurt.

The appeal of adaptation

With large parts of eastern Africa continuing to weather longer and more intense bouts of drought, camels have also emerged as a climate-friendly alternative source of food.

The International Court of Justice grants Somalia the majority of a maritime zone claimed by Kenya

 The International Court of Justice grants Somalia the majority of a maritime zone claimed by Kenya Somalia and Kenya have been opposed since 2009 on the route of their maritime boundary in the Indian Ocean. © Provided by FranceInfo The International Court of Justice (ICJ) issued its arbitration on October 12, 2021, granting Somalia the majority of a maritime zone of 100,000 km², claimed by Kenya.

  In Kenya, your next coffee could be a 'camel-ccino' © Nick Migwi/CNN

According to Kenya's National Drought Management Authority (NDMA), Kenyans living across 23 counties are facing reduced food supplies due to drought and will need food aid within the next six months. 

Unlike herds of cows and sheep, camels can go 100 miles without water and can maintain their cool in temperatures upwards of 120 degrees Fahrenheit. "It provides a hedge in the dry weather as the pressure is felt on traditional livestock," states Hewett, because "camels will continue to produce milk."

Beyond climate considerations, Shariff says a growing clientele of health-conscious consumers have pushed establishments like CJ's Restaurant to serve the milk.

"We've got several people from gym instructors to health nutritionists saying they've found a lot of interesting facts about the camel milk and it's benefits," he says.

The UN Food and Agriculture Organization says camel milk has triple the amount of vitamin C compared to cow's milk. Ongoing studies have also shown evidence that the milk can reduce cholesterol and improve digestive disorders.

Paris Marathon victories for Elisha Rotich and Tigist Memuye

  Paris Marathon victories for Elisha Rotich and Tigist Memuye Kenya's Elisha Rotich set a new course record en route to victory in the Paris Marathon on Sunday, while Tigist Memuye led an Ethiopian podium cleansweep in the women's race. The women's race was claimed by Memuye, who timed 2:26.12 to edge compatriot Yenenesh Dinkesa by three seconds, with Fantu Jimma rounding out the podium a further 7sec adrift. lrb/lp/bspRotich, 31, won in 2hr 04min 23sec, bettering the previous best in the French capital of 2:05.04 set by Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele in 2014.

Getting over the hump

While the potential markets for growth exist, a number of challenges continue to hinder camel milk's expansion in Kenya. Limited roads and a lack of infrastructure and cold storage prevent large-scale production and delivery of the dairy.

"Where most of the ranchers live, it's a harsh environment. We have to invest in refrigerated trucks. We have to invest in making a center for collection," says Warsame.

For a sector built on a network of small family farms, developing the industry to export to profitable markets abroad also presents other hurdles.

"It's very hard to comply with international standards of disease management and control in a multitude of smallholder-produced milk markets," notes Hewett.

Despite the challenges, industry leaders are pushing for a formal value chain to be established. With proper infrastructure, the Kenya Camel Association says the sector could be worth an estimated $200 million annually and impact 10 to 12 million households in northern Kenya whose livelihoods rely on these animals.

To expand the sector, the camel milk industry in Kenya is pushing for a more formal value chain. © Nick Migwi/CNN To expand the sector, the camel milk industry in Kenya is pushing for a more formal value chain.

No animal left behind: Kenya holds first national wildlife census .
The flimsy planes tethered to metal drums to prevent them from accidentally becoming airborne are unlikely weapons in Kenya's fight to protect threatened species as it conducts its first national wildlife census. Decades of unbridled poaching, expanding human settlements and climate change have taken a heavy toll on the global wildlife population -- and central Kenya is no exception.African savanna elephants have been particularly hard-hit, with their numbers plunging by at least 60 percent during the last half-century, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

usr: 1
This is interesting!