•   
  •   
  •   

World Taiwan President Rebuffs China's Xi Jinping in Most Defiant Speech Yet

12:10  24 october  2021
12:10  24 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

What to know about the escalating tensions between China and Taiwan

  What to know about the escalating tensions between China and Taiwan There has been increasing "gray-zone" conflict across the strait. Taiwan’s Defense Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng even warned the Taiwanese legislature earlier this month that Beijing might be able to launch a "full-scale" invasion of the island by 2025.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen rebuffed Chinese leader Xi Jinping in her most defiant speech yet on Sunday after the latter gave a competing address in which he extolled the Communist Party and its plans for the island' s future. In 5,000-word remarks for the 110th anniversary of the Republic of China (ROC)— Taiwan ' s formal name—Tsai called on her Xi also concluded with a stark warning about loyalty to China , saying: "Those who forget their heritage, betray their motherland, and seek to split the country will come to no good end; they will be disdained by the people and condemned by history."

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen rebuffed Chinese leader Xi Jinping in her most defiant speech yet on Sunday after the latter gave a competing address in which he extolled the Communist Party and its plans for the island's future. Load Error. Her address came 24 hours after China ' s Xi spoke at length to mark the Xinhai Revolution of 1911, the event—originating in the central Chinese city of Wuhan—that led to the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and the establishment of the ROC. Xi referenced "a republic on Chinese soil" but didn't name the ROC, which the People's Republic of China (PRC)

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen gives a Republic of China National Day address in Taipei on October 10, 2021. © Makoto Lin/Office of the President, Taiwan Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen gives a Republic of China National Day address in Taipei on October 10, 2021.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen rebuffed Chinese leader Xi Jinping in her most defiant speech yet on Sunday after the latter gave a competing address in which he extolled the Communist Party and its plans for the island's future.

In 5,000-word remarks for the 110th anniversary of the Republic of China (ROC)—Taiwan's formal name—Tsai called on her citizens to be "masters of our own destiny," in a speech her spokesperson described as a heartfelt message from a president who is no longer running for reelection.

Taiwan's Opinion of the Chinese Government Has Never Been Worse

  Taiwan's Opinion of the Chinese Government Has Never Been Worse Polling by a Beijing-friendly newspaper showed 10 percent of Taiwan's public was interested in some form of "unification" with China.According to an annual survey released by local paper United Daily News on Monday, Taiwan's sympathies for Chinese citizens have peaked during the presidency of Tsai Ing-wen, whose administration is most often accused of "desinicization" during its open opposition against the Chinese Communist Party leadership.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen rebuffed Chinese leader Xi Jinping in her most defiant speech yet on Sunday after the latter gave a competing address in which he extolled the Communist Party and its plans for the island’s future. Her address came 24 hours after China ’ s Xi spoke at length to mark the Xinhai Revolution of 1911, the event—originating in the central Chinese city of Wuhan—that led to the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and the establishment of the ROC. Xi referenced “a republic on Chinese soil” but didn’t name the ROC, which the People’s Republic of China (PRC) considers to be over

China ' s President Xi Jinping has said that "reunification" with Taiwan "must be fulfilled", as heightened tensions over the island continue. Mr Xi said unification should be achieved peacefully, but warned that the Chinese people had a "glorious tradition" of opposing separatism. In response, Taiwan said its future lay in the hands of its people. Taiwan considers itself a sovereign state, while China views it as a breakaway province. Beijing has not ruled out the possible use of force to achieve unification. Mr Xi 's intervention comes after China sent a record number of military jets into Taiwan 's

Her address came 24 hours after China's Xi spoke at length to mark the Xinhai Revolution of 1911, the event—originating in the central Chinese city of Wuhan—that led to the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and the establishment of the ROC. Xi referenced "a republic on Chinese soil" but didn't name the ROC, which the People's Republic of China (PRC) considers to be over, despite its de facto existence in Taiwan.

In words that were meant to be heeded by Taiwan's government as well as its people, Xi linked his Taiwan ambitions to the "rejuvenation" of the Chinese nation, calling "unification" of the island "the general trend of Chinese history" and "the common will of all Chinese people." He also reiterated China's intention to rule Taiwan under a Hong Kong–style "one country, two systems" formula.

Taiwan Vows to 'Defend Itself' Amid U.S. Reversal, Here's How Much Stronger China Is

  Taiwan Vows to 'Defend Itself' Amid U.S. Reversal, Here's How Much Stronger China Is "The complete reunification of the motherland must be fulfilled, and it will definitely be fulfilled," Ma Xiaoguang of China's Taiwan Affairs Council said.President Joe Biden stirred controversy during a Thursday evening town hall when he twice appeared to confirm that he had a commitment to protect Taiwan in the event of an attack, one that would presumably come from China, where President Xi Jinping has vowed to take reintegrate the rival government by diplomacy, or force, if necessary.

© Makoto Lin/Office of the President , Taiwan Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen gives a virtual keynote address to the Czech Republic's Forum 2000 Foundation on October 11, 2021. According to an annual survey released by local paper United Daily News on Monday, Taiwan 's sympathies for Chinese citizens have peaked during the presidency of Tsai Ing-wen, whose administration is most often accused of "desinicization" during Taiwan President Rebuffs China ' s Xi Jinping in Most Defiant Speech Yet . China Ramps up Coal Production to Highest Level This Year to Avert Energy Crisis.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen rebuffed Chinese leader Xi Jinping in her most defiant speech yet on Sunday after the latter gave a competing address in which he extolled the Communist Party and its plans for the island’ s future. In 5,000-word remarks for the 110th anniversary of the Republic of China (ROC)— Taiwan ’ s formal name—Tsai called on her citizens to be “masters of our own destiny,” in a speech her spokesperson described as a heartfelt message from a president who is no longer running for reelection.

He struck an overall softer tone by emphasizing unification by peaceful means, saying it serves both China and Taiwan. Beijing's officials, however, continue to remind their counterparts in Taipei that China will never renounce the use of force to achieve their goal.

Xi also concluded with a stark warning about loyalty to China, saying: "Those who forget their heritage, betray their motherland, and seek to split the country will come to no good end; they will be disdained by the people and condemned by history."

A Taiwan Army CH-47 Chinhook flies a national flag above the Presidential Office in Taipei to mark the 110th Republic of China National Day on October 10, 2021. Wang Yu Ching/Office of the President, Taiwan © Wang Yu Ching/Office of the President, Taiwan A Taiwan Army CH-47 Chinhook flies a national flag above the Presidential Office in Taipei to mark the 110th Republic of China National Day on October 10, 2021. Wang Yu Ching/Office of the President, Taiwan

In Tsai's prepared remarks the next day—described by commentators as the strongest of her presidency so far—she didn't shy away from speaking out against China's military intimidation and political isolation of Taiwan.

White House plays cleanup on Biden's Taiwan comments

  White House plays cleanup on Biden's Taiwan comments The White House was still setting the record straight more than 12 hours after President Joe Biden pledged to defend Taiwan militarily from China, charging that the president’s comment did not amount to a change of policy. © Provided by Washington Examiner “There has been no shift. The president was not announcing any change in our policy. Nor has he made a decision to change our policy,” press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters on Friday, adding, “There’s no change in our policy.

Taiwan President Rebuffs China ' s Xi Jinping in Most Defiant Speech Yet . World. Joe Biden's ' Taiwan Agreement' With Xi Jinping Causes Confusion. The president told reporters on Tuesday that he and Chinese leader Xi Jinping had agreed to "abide by the Taiwan agreement."

BEIJING, July 1 (Xinhua) -- Xi Jinping , general secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, Chinese president and chairman of the Central Military Commission, on Thursday addressed a ceremony celebrating the CPC centenary at Tian'anmen Square in Beijing. Please see the attachment for the full text of the speech .

"But the more we achieve, the greater the pressure we face from China," Tsai said, following her praise for Taiwan's part in global health contributions and its shoring up of the global semiconductor supply chain. "So I want to remind all my fellow citizens that we do not have the privilege of letting down our guard."

"We call for maintaining the status quo, and we will do our utmost to prevent the status quo from being unilaterally altered," she said, before repeating her desire for meaningful dialogue with Beijing "on the basis of parity."

She added: "We hope for an easing of cross-strait relations and will not act rashly, but there should be absolutely no illusions that the Taiwanese people will bow to pressure. We will continue to bolster our national defense and demonstrate our determination to defend ourselves in order to ensure that nobody can force Taiwan to take the path China has laid out for us."

China's plan for Taiwan "offers neither a free and democratic way of life for Taiwan, nor sovereignty for our 23 million people," she argued.

US Isn’t Alone in Support of Taiwan

  US Isn’t Alone in Support of Taiwan There has been an extraordinary amount of talk in policy circles recently about Taiwan and the U.S. commitment to Taiwan’s security—and for good reason. © Provided by Washington Examiner A soldier holds a Taiwan national flag during a military exercise in Hsinchu County, northern Taiwan, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021. Taiwanese troops using tanks, mortars and small arms staged a drill Tuesday aimed at repelling an attack from China, which has increased its threats to reclaim the island and its own displays of military might.

Tsai committed to four positions that she called "the bottom line and common denominator" most widely accepted by the people of Taiwan. Among them were the insistence that the ROC and PRC "should not be subordinate to each other" as well as Taiwan's commitment to "resist annexation or encroachment upon our sovereignty."

The future of Taiwan, Tsai said, "must be decided in accordance with the will of the Taiwanese people"—a direct rejection of Xi's view that Taiwan's future as a province of China is the "will of all Chinese people."

Tsai concluded her remarks with a pledge to push constitutional amendments and institutional reforms that will preserve Taiwan's democratic system.

Related Articles

  • China Will 'Lose Everything' If It Starts Taiwan War—former Marine Colonel
  • Taiwan Not Concerned About War With China, Despite Sky-high Tensions
  • 'Taiwan Will Do Whatever It Takes to Defend Itself,' President Says

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Taiwan defense minister says island must defend itself .
TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan's defense minister said Thursday that Taiwan must be prepared to defend itself and could not entirely depend on other countries to help if China were to launch an attack against the island, even as Taiwan's president said she had faith the U.S. would defend it. “The country must rely on itself, and if any friends or other groups can help us, then it's like I said before, we're happy to have it, but we cannot completely depend on it," the minister, Chiu Kuo-cheng, told reporters after being questioned in the legislature as part of a session on national defense.

usr: 3
This is interesting!