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World Protests erupt across Sudan against military coup

01:35  26 october  2021
01:35  26 october  2021 Source:   pri.org

Sudan's key Red Sea ports coveted by regional powers

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The Sudanese military has launched a coup attempt against the country's government — even though military officials were already part of that same government. It risks losing crucial international and local support. Crowds of protesters have taken to the streets of Khartoum to call for the military to take power. The current political tensions in Sudan could jeopardize the country's transition to democracy. France to lend Sudan .5 billion to pay off IMF debt, Germany offers assistance 17.05.2021.

The head of Sudan ’s ruling council, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, has announced the dissolution of the transitional sovereign council and the government, enacting a state of emergency amid a military coup after the PM’s arrest. The Sovereign Council had been tasked with overseeing a four-year transition to democracy after long-time leader Omar al-Bashir was removed from power in 2019 in the wake of months of civil unrest and protests . The council leader claimed he was forced to act following months of infighting between military and civilian leaders, while some calls from politicians amounted to

Across Sudan, people have taken to the streets to protest a military coup that threatens their hopes for a democratic future.

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters take to the streets to condemn a takeover by military officials in Khartoum, Sudan, Oct. 25, 2021. Sudan’s military seized power Monday, dissolving the transitional government hours after troops arrested the acting prime minister and other officials.  © Ashraf Idris/AP

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters take to the streets to condemn a takeover by military officials in Khartoum, Sudan, Oct. 25, 2021. Sudan’s military seized power Monday, dissolving the transitional government hours after troops arrested the acting prime minister and other officials.

For two years, the country has been run by a tense and volatile power-sharing agreement between civilian and military leaders that was established after former dictator Omar al-Bashir was ousted from power.

PM, officials detained, internet down in apparent Sudan coup

  PM, officials detained, internet down in apparent Sudan coup CAIRO (AP) — Sudan's interim prime minister and a number of senior government officials were arrested Monday, the information ministry said, describing the actions as a military coup. The internet in the country was largely cut off and military forces closed bridges, according to the ministry’s Facebook page. It said the whereabouts of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok were not immediately known. Meanwhile, the country’s state news channel played patriotic traditional music and scenes of the Nile river. The country's main pro-democracy group and the largest political party urged people in separate appeals to take to the streets to counter the apparent military coup.

Protests have erupted in several cities including the capital Khartoum after the military coup . People have taken to the streets in Sudan to protest against the military coup . The military has dissolved civilian rule, arrested political leaders and declared a state of emergency. The coup leader, Gen Abdel Fattah Burhan, has blamed political infighting.

Demonstrators protest against prospect of military rule in Khartoum, Sudan © Reuters. In December of 2018 protests amidst a deepening economic crisis began in the Sudanese town of Artaba, quickly sweeping the entire nation. After months of consistent nationwide demonstrations demanding the removal of the long-time autocratic ruler, President Omar Bashir, Sudan ’s Minister of Defence, General Ahmed Ibn Auf, announced that Bashir had been arrested after almost 30 years in power.

Tensions came to a critical point on Monday when armed forces detained Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, Cabinet Affairs Minister Khalid Omer Yousif and other top civilian leaders.

Related: After the revolution, a secular Sudan?

“We still don’t know any news about the whereabouts of the prime minister, his wife, five of the ministers and a number of political leaders who were arrested in the early hours of this morning,” said Yousif’s adviser, Abdelmoniem el-Jack, over the phone from Khartoum.

Jack, who is currently in hiding, said the military takeover was driven by three contested issues with the civilian leaders: unification of armed forces, reclaiming of economic resources controlled by the military, and justice for victims of violence during the 2019 revolution and the genocide in Darfur.

US 'deeply alarmed' by reports of military takeover in Sudan

  US 'deeply alarmed' by reports of military takeover in Sudan The U.S. expressed alarm on Monday over an apparent military coup in Sudan, shortly after the Biden administration's special envoy for the Horn of Africa was in the country encouraging cooperation between civilian and military leaders of Khartoum's transitional government. Thousands of protesters took to the streets after reports emerged that the country's Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok was detained, with some reports suggesting the leader was put under house arrest, in addition to reports of detention of other senior government officials. "The US is deeply alarmed at reports of a military take-over of the transitional government.

Thousands protest after Sudan ’s military seizes power in a coup and arrests interim PM Abdalla Hamdok. Protesters poured into the streets of Khartoum and its twin city of Omdurman following the early morning arrests of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and other senior officials [AFP]. The Forces of Freedom and Change, Sudan ’s main opposition coalition, called for civil disobedience and protests across the country and demanded that the transitional military council transfer power back to the civilian government.

He called on the Sudanese military to immediately release the detained officials, and warned that the US is “willing to resort to any and all appropriate measures to hold accountable those who may be attempting to derail the will and the aspirations of the Sudanese people.” Tension between civilian and military leaders had simmered in Sudan since the transition to democracy began in 2019. As Price and the US’ allies condemned the military coup , protests in Sudan were reportedly met with force.

Related: Sudan's troubled attempt at education reform

In a national TV address on Monday, Gen. Abdul-Fattah al-Burhan, who chaired the Sovereign Council, announced they were dissolving the government and declared a state of emergency.

“Usually, when a coup happens in Sudanese history, they always come like this. ... They say given the economic situation, [the] political insecurity that’s happening, we’ve decided to take over the reins of power.”"

Jihad Mashamoun, Sudanese political analyst, United Kingdom

“Usually, when a coup happens in Sudanese history, they always come like this,” observed Jihad Mashamoun, a Sudanese political analyst based in the United Kingdom.

“They say given the economic situation, [the] political insecurity that’s happening, we’ve decided to take over the reins of power.”

Indeed, Sudan has been in a near-constant political and economic crisis since the 2019 revolution.

What led to the coup in Sudan?

  What led to the coup in Sudan? Sudan is in crisis after the military dissolved the country's power-sharing transitional government and declared a state of emergency on Monday. © AFP/Getty Images Sudanese protesters burn tyres to block a road in the capital Khartoum. The move has crushed hopes for a peaceful transition of power following the ousting of former President Omar al-Bashir in 2019. Here's what you need to know:What's going on in Sudan?Sudan had been ruled by an uneasy alliance between the military and civilian groups since 2019, but on Monday, the military effectively took control.

The 2019–2021 Sudanese protests consisted of street protests in Sudan starting from mid-September 2019 during the 2019 Sudanese transition to democracy, on issues that included the nomination of a new Chief Justice of Sudan and Attorney-General

Military forces have been deployed in Khartoum, restricting civilians' movement and using tear gas to disperse protests , reports suggest. 25.10.2021, Sputnik International.

The civilian-led government has been largely unable to address the high prices of basic goods, high unemployment and ongoing political instability in parts of the country.

Related: After the revolution, Sudanese women ask what's next?

“This has all been rather carefully constructed by the military who have sought to portray the government as unable to do the job of responding to the needs of the Sudanese population and have used that as a pretext now to take control of Sudan’s fragile transition."

Jonas Horner, senior Sudan analyst, International Crisis Group

“This has all been rather carefully constructed by the military who have sought to portray the government as unable to do the job of responding to the needs of the Sudanese population and have used that as a pretext now to take control of Sudan’s fragile transition,” said Jonas Horner, senior Sudan analyst at the International Crisis Group.

But the military appears to have made a major miscalculation about how the people would respond to them taking over power.

“They did not anticipate that people would go out and protest,” Mashamoun said. “They anticipated that the people would just be calm because they got tired of the economic crisis.”

Sudan’s military has seized power in a coup. Here’s why it matters

  Sudan’s military has seized power in a coup. Here’s why it matters A coup in Sudan has been met by widespread international condemnation, amid growing fears about the country's democratic transition and economy. The military arrested civilian Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and dissolved the country's transitional government on Monday, sparking protests in several cities. According to Reuters, seven people have been killed and 140 injured in the ensuing clashes between security forces and protesters.Experts say the coup could have a serious impact on the country and beyond.The coupTensions in Sudan have been simmering since an attempted coup on Sept.

Instead, the opposite has been true. The resounding support for civilian leadership has been on display on the streets of Khartoum as peaceful protesters marched outside the army headquarters.

“All the streets were blocked by stones and people refusing this thing from the military and refusing to be governed by the military people."

Aymen Sayeed, protester, Khartoum, Sudan

“All the streets were blocked by stones and people refusing this thing from the military and refusing to be governed by the military people,” said demonstrator Aymen Sayeed over the phone from Khartoum.

“Give the power back to the people,” he added via text message to The World after the phone connection disconnected.

While the internet and telecommunication services have largely been cut off, trickles of information have come through on social media, shedding light on the scale of civilian mobilization but also the deadly response by armed forces.

In a social media post, the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors said at least three people had died and more than 80 people had been injured.

Jack, the government adviser, says the international community must act against the leaders of the military coup.

“There is a need for whole isolation from the international and regional community against General Burhan, General Hemeti, and all those who are involved in this coup."

Abdel-moniem El-Jack, adviser to Cabinet Affairs Minister Khalid Omer Yousif

“There is a need for whole isolation from the international and regional community against Gen. Burhan, Gen. [Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo] Hemeti, and all those who are involved in this coup,” said Jack, who called on the United Nations Security Council to sanction the leaders and for the African Union to revoke Sudan’s membership.

In light of the coup, the United States said it was pausing $700 million in emergency economic support for Sudan that was meant to support the country’s democratic transition.

Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok says he'll never step down 'willingly' in the wake of coup .
Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, who is under house arrest following a military coup on Monday, says that he will never "willingly" stand down, according to sources close to the prime minister. © AFP/Getty Images Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok chairs an emergency cabinet session in Khartoum, Sudan, on October 18, 2021. Hamdok's remarks come a day after hundreds of thousands of people demonstrated across the country in opposition to the October 25 takeover, and as international condemnation of the military's actions grows.

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