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World Photos: Glasgow conference to address rainforests, climate change

13:10  28 october  2021
13:10  28 october  2021 Source:   latimes.com

Biden sees American credibility on the line as he races to lock down climate action ahead of Glasgow

  Biden sees American credibility on the line as he races to lock down climate action ahead of Glasgow President Joe Biden wanted the stakes to be perfectly clear when he sat down with nine liberal Democrats in the Oval Office Tuesday to discuss ongoing legislative negotiations. © Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 22: U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks during a virtual Leaders Summit on Climate with 40 world leaders at the East Room of the White House April 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions by half by 2030.

This Sunday, delegates from more than 200 nations meet in Glasgow, Scotland, for the United Nations climate summit known as COP26.

A villager burns brush on a hillside to clear space for tourist cabins in Tumbira, Brazil. In 2008, the government turned hundreds of thousands of acres of rainforest surrounding the tiny community in the Amazon jungle into a © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A villager burns brush on a hillside to clear space for tourist cabins in Tumbira, Brazil. In 2008, the government turned hundreds of thousands of acres of rainforest surrounding the tiny community in the Amazon jungle into a "sustainable development reserve." To dissuade residents from foresting, a nonprofit helped the village open an eco-resort. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

“We can either save our world or condemn humanity to a hellish future,” U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said in a tweet to COP26 delegates.

Presidents, prime ministers, activists and royals: who’s going to COP26, Glasgow’s climate change conference

  Presidents, prime ministers, activists and royals: who’s going to COP26, Glasgow’s climate change conference What do President Joe Biden, Queen Elizabeth II, teenage activist Greta Thunberg and even some Republican members of Congress have in common? In total, 120 heads of state will be appearing at the two-week conference. But even compared to other countries, Biden is bringing quite a crew, including former Sec. of State John Kerry, who currently serves as special presidential envoy on climate change, and former Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Administrator Gina McCarthy, who is the first White House national climate advisor. “Glasgow will be extremely important,” Kerry said in an interview last week with the BBC.

Los Angeles Times photographer Luis Sinco has documented the destruction of rainforests in Brazil and Indonesia. These two countries accounted for more than a third of tropical tree cover in 2000, and represented nearly half of all tropical tree cover loss between 2001 and 2014.

Logs are harvested from a clear-cut area on the banks of the Kampar River near Teluk Meranti, Indonesia. The equatorial nation is destroying its forests at a faster pace than any other country, a rate of destruction that has established the archipelago as the world's third-largest greenhouse polluter behind the United States and China, experts say. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) Logs are harvested from a clear-cut area on the banks of the Kampar River near Teluk Meranti, Indonesia. The equatorial nation is destroying its forests at a faster pace than any other country, a rate of destruction that has established the archipelago as the world's third-largest greenhouse polluter behind the United States and China, experts say. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

The Brazilian rainforest has long been one of the world’s most important carbon sinks, but it is losing that ability as trees are cleared. Deforested parts of the Amazon now emit more carbon than they absorb.

John Kerry Is Bringing America Back Into the Climate Fight

  John Kerry Is Bringing America Back Into the Climate Fight John Kerry Is Bringing America Back Into the Climate FightAs tourists on the other side of the patio snap photos of Mount Vesuvius looming in the background, Kerry is warning about the fate of human life on earth. Kerry, 77, has been on the public stage for decades as a Senator, presidential candidate and U.S. Secretary of State and, on paper, his latest role representing the U.S. as President Biden’s climate envoy may look like a demotion. But Kerry rejects any question about why he’s taken this role. The fate of civilization is on the line, and he will do anything he can to help. “I’ve fought around war and peace, and that was life and death.

Since the 1980s, the amount of forest land in Sumatra, Indonesia — the world’s sixth-largest island, which once contained more animal species than the Amazon — has been slashed more than 70%.

Studies show that the carbon released by logging in Brazil and Indonesia exceeds that of all the buses, planes and cars on the planet. Brazil contributes more carbon, but Indonesia is clearing its forest at the fastest rate on Earth.

A plantation worker carries palm seedlings to be planted on a cleared and burned swath of peatland rainforest in Riau province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Scientific studies indicate that Indonesia's carbon emissions are likely to increase, as most future forest clearance will be conducted in areas with deep peat, which releases greenhouse gases when it decomposes or burns, thus accelerating global warming. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A plantation worker carries palm seedlings to be planted on a cleared and burned swath of peatland rainforest in Riau province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Scientific studies indicate that Indonesia's carbon emissions are likely to increase, as most future forest clearance will be conducted in areas with deep peat, which releases greenhouse gases when it decomposes or burns, thus accelerating global warming. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) An Indonesian park ranger surveys the destruction of an illegally-logged portion of Tesso Nilo National Park in Central Sumatra. In the last 20 years, illegal logging and large-scale farming have resulted in the loss of about 60% of animal habitat. Only about 10% of the remaining forests are suitable for wild elephants. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) An Indonesian park ranger surveys the destruction of an illegally-logged portion of Tesso Nilo National Park in Central Sumatra. In the last 20 years, illegal logging and large-scale farming have resulted in the loss of about 60% of animal habitat. Only about 10% of the remaining forests are suitable for wild elephants. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A logging truck rolls through a town in Central Sumatra, Indonesia, where tropical rainforests are being cleared at an alarming rate to make way for vast industrial plantations devoted to pulp wood and palm oil production. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A logging truck rolls through a town in Central Sumatra, Indonesia, where tropical rainforests are being cleared at an alarming rate to make way for vast industrial plantations devoted to pulp wood and palm oil production. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A deckhand coils the mooring lines of a riverboat on the Kampar River in Teluk Meranti, Indonesia. The village is located in Riau province, often called ground zero of the war on global warming. Greenpeace studies show that Riau's peatlands contain the highest concentration of carbon per acre in the world. When companies burn the forest to sow new wood pulp and palm oil plantations, that carbon is released into the atmosphere. Studies show that the carbon released by logging in Brazil and Indonesia amounts to more than the sum of all the buses, planes and cars on the planet. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A deckhand coils the mooring lines of a riverboat on the Kampar River in Teluk Meranti, Indonesia. The village is located in Riau province, often called ground zero of the war on global warming. Greenpeace studies show that Riau's peatlands contain the highest concentration of carbon per acre in the world. When companies burn the forest to sow new wood pulp and palm oil plantations, that carbon is released into the atmosphere. Studies show that the carbon released by logging in Brazil and Indonesia amounts to more than the sum of all the buses, planes and cars on the planet. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A plume of smoke rises from a fire in the jungle along the banks of the Rio Negro near Tumbira, Brazil. Patches of the Amazon rainforest are burned and cleared every day. In 2008, the government turned hundreds of thousands of acres of rainforest surrounding Tumbira into a © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A plume of smoke rises from a fire in the jungle along the banks of the Rio Negro near Tumbira, Brazil. Patches of the Amazon rainforest are burned and cleared every day. In 2008, the government turned hundreds of thousands of acres of rainforest surrounding Tumbira into a "sustainable development reserve." However, the COVID-19 pandemic greatly slowed the flow of tourists to the area. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) Residents of Tumbira, Brazil, play soccer as the sun sets on a playfield in the middle of town. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) Residents of Tumbira, Brazil, play soccer as the sun sets on a playfield in the middle of town. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A child plays video games while swinging in a hammock in a home along the banks of the Rio Negro in Tumbira, Brazil. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A child plays video games while swinging in a hammock in a home along the banks of the Rio Negro in Tumbira, Brazil. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) A bird perches on a tree as the sun rises along the banks of the Rio Negro in Tumbira, Brazil. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) © (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times) A bird perches on a tree as the sun rises along the banks of the Rio Negro in Tumbira, Brazil. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Climate march keeps up pressure on leaders at U.N. summit .
GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — The public pressure that helped spur more world action on global warming is due to be on full display outside the U.N. climate summit Saturday, when thousands of demonstrators are expected to march through the rainy grey streets of Glasgow to demand leaders move faster to cut fossil fuels that are wrecking the climate. Police helicopters buzzed over Glasgow early Saturday as authorities prepared for a second day of protests by climate activists. Scots are accustomed to inclement weather, and turnout for the march was expected to be strong despite stiff gusts and a drizzle that turned to cold rain.

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This is interesting!