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World UNESCO awards Gabon's Ivindo park World Heritage status

13:30  25 november  2021
13:30  25 november  2021 Source:   afp.com

UNESCO awards Gabon's Ivindo park World Heritage status

  UNESCO awards Gabon's Ivindo park World Heritage status Gabon's Ivindo National Park was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on Wednesday in recognition of the nation's success in defending biodiversity and challenging climate change. The park is the second nature reserve -- after Lope Park in 2007 -- to be listed in this small central African country, which is 90 percent covered by forest and known for efforts to preserve its natural heritage. "A great day," tweeted President Ali Bongo Ondimba, adding that the inclusion "rewards Gabon's efforts to protect its forests, which play a key role in the fight against global warming".

Gabon's Ivindo National Park was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on Wednesday in recognition of the nation's success in defending biodiversity and challenging climate change.

a close up of an animal: The 300,000-hectare (740,000-acre) Ivindo park is is home to many engangered animals such as gorillas © Handout The 300,000-hectare (740,000-acre) Ivindo park is is home to many engangered animals such as gorillas

The park is the second nature reserve -- after Lope Park in 2007 -- to be listed in this small central African country, which is 90 percent covered by forest and known for efforts to preserve its natural heritage.

"A great day," tweeted President Ali Bongo Ondimba, adding that the inclusion "rewards Gabon's efforts to protect its forests, which play a key role in the fight against global warming".

The Great Barrier Reef actually is "in danger"

  The Great Barrier Reef actually is Australia has not acknowledged the obvious link between its responsibilities for managing the Great Barrier Reef for future generations.Australia reacted angrily to the draft decision by UNESCO in late June to downgrade the status of the Reef, which was described by Prime Minister Scott Morrison as "appalling." In response, Australia immediately launched an aggressive diplomatic offensive that persuaded the 21-country World Heritage Committee this week to reject UNESCO's science-based advice. But the reprieve may be short-lived - the committee will assess Australia's progress again next year.

At the end of June, Gabon became the first African country to be paid by international funds to continue its efforts against deforestation on its territory.

The 300,000-hectare (740,000-acre) park is home to some emblematic mammals, now threatened, such as the forest elephant, gorilla, chimpanzee, leopard and three species of pangolin.

Some parts of the site are barely explored, according to UNESCO.

For several years, the Gabonese authorities have developed a relatively advanced policy to protect the Central African rainforest, called "the second lung of the earth" after the Amazon.

It has 13 national parks, covering 11 percent of its territory, and 20 marine protected areas. Gabon is home to nearly 60 percent of Africa's remaining forest elephants, recently listed as critically endangered.

amt/pbr/jj

New coral is born on the Great Barrier Reef .
The Great Barrier Reef has "given birth" in its annual coral spawn, creating a cacophony of color on the Australian landmark. © Gareth Phillips/Reef Teach Scientists working beneath the waves say they witnessed the event, in which coral simultaneously release sperm and eggs en masse, overnight Tuesday off the coast of Cairns, Queensland, hailing it as a positive sign the reef was able to regenerate despite ecological threats.

usr: 1
This is interesting!