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World Michael McCaul Predicts Taiwan Invasion After Olympics, Ukraine 'in the Next Month'

06:59  22 january  2022
06:59  22 january  2022 Source:   newsweek.com

Russia is risking all-out war to prevent Ukraine from joining NATO

  Russia is risking all-out war to prevent Ukraine from joining NATO Russia's dealings — or, more accurately, its clashes — with the West have focused on one country in recent years: Ukraine.It's back in focus this week with a series of high-stakes meetings taking place between Russian and western officials which are centered on trying to diffuse heightened tensions between Russia and its neighbor.

The top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee said he expects Russia and China will invade smaller neighboring countries allied with the U.S. after the winter Olympics wrap up in Beijing in late February.

Rep. Mike McCaul, the top ranking Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said on Friday that Russia and China could launch invasions of smaller U.S-backed neighbors by next month. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Rep. Mike McCaul, the top ranking Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said on Friday that Russia and China could launch invasions of smaller U.S-backed neighbors by next month.

Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, told reporters on Friday that he expects Russia to invade Ukraine and China to use military action to retake Taiwan, according to The Washington Examiner.

Top Republican on foreign affairs committee believes US is in new cold war with Russia

  Top Republican on foreign affairs committee believes US is in new cold war with Russia The top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee said Sunday he thinks the US is engaged in a new cold war with Russia amid high tensions between the nations over Russia's potential invasion of Ukraine. © Ting Shen/Pool/Getty Images Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX) speaks in the House Committee On Foreign Affairs March 10, 2021, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. "I do. I do, because I think (Russia President Vladimir) Putin again smells weakness here," Rep. Michael McCaul, a Republican of Texas, told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union" when asked whether he thinks there's a new cold war happening.

"My prediction is that you're going to see Russia invading Ukraine in the next month," he said. "And I think after the Olympics ... China's gotten so provocative, so aggressive in the South China Sea that you will begin to see CCP, Communist Party, invade Taiwan."

China has vowed for the last seven decades to reclaim the self-governing island of Taiwan, which has aligned itself closely with the U.S. On Friday, China again accused the U.S. of encroaching on its sovereignty after a U.S. Navy warship entered the disputed South China Sea claimed by Beijing.

Zhu Fenglian, spokesperson for the Chinese government's State Council Taiwan Affairs Office, said at a press conference on Friday that supporters of Taiwan's independence will hurt peace and stability, adding that those who play with fire will only get burnt, according to the state-run Xinhua news agency.

EXPLAINER: What are US military options to help Ukraine?

  EXPLAINER: What are US military options to help Ukraine? WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is not planning to answer a further Russian invasion of Ukraine by sending combat troops. But he could pursue a range of less dramatic yet still risky military options, including supporting a post-invasion Ukrainian resistance. The rationale for not directly joining a Russia-Ukraine war is simple. The United States has no treaty obligation to Ukraine, and war with Russia would be an enormous gamble, given its potential for expanding in Europe, destabilizing the region, and escalating to the frightening point of risking a nuclear exchange. Doing too little has its risks, too.

Russia has amassed roughly 100,000 troops along its border with Ukraine, as President Joe Biden has sought to stave off an invasion of the former Soviet republic. Ceasefire violations along the front line between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists have increased by nearly 400 percent since last year, according to a Newsweek analysis.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has insisted the U.S. agree that Ukraine not join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), a Cold War-era alliance that has since extended to Poland and other European countries. McCaul told reporters that even an agreement over NATO's expansion won't stop Putin from destabilizing Ukraine, according to a Tweet from NBC's Andrea Mitchell.

"Putin will see a green light to invade the breadbasket of Russia," McCaul added, according to the Examiner. "He's always wanted it back, and as he looks at now President Biden as a weak president, in his calculation, no matter what the tough language is from Biden, he sees the weakness as there's no action taken by this administration."

U.S. rushes weapons into Ukraine as Biden predicts a Russian invasion

  U.S. rushes weapons into Ukraine as Biden predicts a Russian invasion Secretary of State Antony Blinken is trying to keep NATO allies on the "same page" after Mr. Biden said it was his "guess" that Putin would order forces to "move in" to Ukraine."He has to do something," Mr. Biden said during a White House news conference, warning that if Putin did decide to invade his neighbor, Russia would suffer "consequential" loss of life. The president didn't elaborate on the level of military assistance the U.S. might offer Ukraine in the face of an invasion, but it came as his administration worked with NATO allies to bolster Ukraine's forces — and quickly.

While Biden has warned Putin of severe consequences for an invasion of Ukraine, he was criticized for suggesting on Wednesday the response might be smaller for a "minor incursion." The White House has since followed up with a clarifying statement that if any Russian military forces move across the Ukrainian border it will be "met with a swift, severe, and united response from the United States and our Allies."

The U.S. State Department responded to McCaul by pointing to remarks made by Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Friday reiterating that "the United States and our European allies and partners ...stand firmly with Ukraine in support of its sovereignty and territorial integrity" and will respond firmly to any Russian violation of its borders.

While McCaul said he couldn't discuss classified information, he expects Russia to invade Ukraine in the next month, according to Fox News.

"The key to addressing Russian aggression is deterrence," McCaul said in a Tweet following up his remarks. "This administration has done far too little to deter Russia from further invading Ukraine."

GOP Blames Biden for Russian Aggression. Don’t Forget About Trump.

  GOP Blames Biden for Russian Aggression. Don’t Forget About Trump. As Russian President Vladimir Putin lays the groundwork for an invasion into Ukraine, Republicans in Congress have been laying the groundwork to blame President Joe Biden for failing to prevent an attack. But it’s former President Donald Trump, recently retired military officials and diplomats told The Daily Beast, who may bear more responsibility for the looming crisis with Russia than Biden. Trump, whose relationship with Russia has been famously complicated, pushed back on providing aid to Ukraine in 2017. Trump was reportedly resistant to providing the security aid, in part, because he wanted Ukraine to pay the United States back.

McCaul pointed to the GUARD Act, legislation he introduced with other Republicans earlier this month that would expedite Ukraine's entry to NATO, while boosting funding for weapons and training for the country's military.

Newsweek has reached out to the U.S. State Department for a response.

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Biden Says Russian Invasion of Ukraine Could Be 'Largest Invasion Since WWII' .
President Joe Biden again warned Russia of severe consequences if it invades Ukraine, saying the military operation would have worldwide effects.Biden again underscored the gravity of the tense situation at the border between the two Eastern European countries, where Russia has amassed 100,000 troops in possible preparation of an invasion of the former Soviet republic.

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