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World Ukrainian minister says Russia blocking access to medicines

13:31  13 august  2022
13:31  13 august  2022 Source:   msn.com

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KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine’s health minister has accused Russian authorities of committing a crime against humanity by blocking access to affordable medicines in areas its forces have occupied since invading the country 5 1/2 months ago.

Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Liashko speaks to The Associated Press reporters during an interview on Friday, Aug. 12, 2022. Liashko accused Russian authorities of blocking access to affordable medicines in areas of Ukraine it has occupied since the invasion was launched on Feb. 24. He described the action as a © Provided by Associated Press Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Liashko speaks to The Associated Press reporters during an interview on Friday, Aug. 12, 2022. Liashko accused Russian authorities of blocking access to affordable medicines in areas of Ukraine it has occupied since the invasion was launched on Feb. 24. He described the action as a "crime against humanity." (AP Photo/Vasilisa Stepanenko)

In an interview with The Associated Press, Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Liashko said Russian authorities repeatedly have blocked efforts to provide state-subsidized drugs to people in occupied cities, towns and villages.

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“Throughout the entire six months of war, Russia has not (allowed) proper humanitarian corridors so we could provide our own medicines to the patients that need them,” Liashko said, speaking at the Health Ministry in Kyiv late Friday.

“We believe that these actions are being taken with intent by Russia, and we consider them to be crimes against humanity and war crimes that will be documented and will be recognized,” the minister said.

The Ukrainian government has a program that provides medications to people with cancer and chronic health conditions. The destruction of hospitals and infrastructure along with the displacement of an estimated 7 million people inside the country also have interfered with other forms of treatment, according to United Nations and Ukrainian officials.

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The war in Ukraine has caused severe disruptions to the country’s state-run health service, which was undergoing major reforms, largely in response to the coronavirus pandemic, when Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered his troops to invade on Feb. 24.

The World Health Organization said it recorded 445 attacks on hospitals and other health care facilities as of Aug. 11 that directly resulted in 86 deaths and 105 injuries.

But Liashko said the secondary effects were far more severe.

“When roads and bridges have been damaged in areas now controlled by the Ukrainian forces... it is difficult to get someone who had a heart attack or a stroke to the hospital,” he said. “Sometimes, we can’t make it in time, the ambulance can’t get there in time. That’s why war causes many more casualties (than those killed in the fighting). It’s a number that cannot be calculated.” ___ Full coverage of the war in Ukraine: https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine ___ Follow Gatopoulos at https://twitter.com/dgatopoulos and Arhirova at https://twitter.com/h_arhirova

Ukraine's Black Sea deal also helps Russian farmers, economy .
With much fanfare, ship after ship loaded with grain has sailed from Ukraine after being stuck in the country's Black Sea ports for nearly six months. More quietly, a parallel wartime deal met Moscow’s demands to clear the way for its wheat to get to the world, too, boosting an industry vital to Russia’s economy that had been ensnared in wider sanctions. While the U.S. and its European allies work to crush Russia's finances with a web ofWhile the U.S. and its European allies work to crush Russia's finances with a web of penalties for invading Ukraine, they have avoided sanctioning its grains and other goods that feed people worldwide.

usr: 1
This is interesting!